cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
I think I saw this article half a week ago, but I'm still spitting-nails mad that the Moff thinks society is so wonderfully accepting and non-disapproving nowadays that he has to make it clear that Holmes is DEFINITELY straight, not gay, and in conclusion cousins not attracted to Watson even if he somehow was. Oh really. That's so nice of you. Thank you, Moffat. I'm glad to know that in your view, everybody in this modern world except you (and Benedict Cumberbatch, of course) is completely non-judgmental of the gays!

It's so much worse, somehow, when they are evidently in some way trying. Moffat, for instance, appears from this quote to have given genuine thought to the Holmes/Watson relationship and to the appearance of Gay, and, while earnestly believing that he and society are joyously enlightened, concluded that Holmes and Watson couldn't be that kind of guys. He probably doesn't have the faintest inkling that there's anything wrong (or incongruous) in his protestations. A bit like Whedon's constant, earnest, annoyingly unconscious misogynyfails. (Cumberbatch's remarks, on the other hand, make it instantly clear that he's too clueless to even enter the Gay 101 lecture hall, being instead still lost in the Gender Essentialism Orientation Scavenger Hunt, located outside in the Girlyman Manlygirl Quadrangle.)

I'm still looking forward, though, with some mixed feelings, to the forthcoming episodes1. As Holmes fanfiction it's very good, and Cumberbatch's performance really impressed me, prompting mental comparison to Brett's (not that I'd place them on the same level) without seeming derivative. A time-period AU is one of the most delicate and easily-fucked-up forms of derivative work, in my view: the task of capturing the essence of characterization while stripping away most or all of the verbal expressions the characters use is beyond most fan writers. Time period or characterization usually falters, and in the end most of these AUs stand or fall according to how well they're able to distract you from that weak point. I was expecting something that would be fun enough to cover the inevitable gap. Instead I got some strikingly good characterization. Of course, the crime-solving-related plots were incredibly silly and contained some giant holes, but frankly, if they made sense it would be far less like ACD.



1. My personal 'hate the creator, hate the fanwork' function only cuts off all ability to enjoy when the creator has been an unmitigated asshole in such a way that no possible fanwank could explain their behavior as being in good faith.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
A bit of impatience for the new movie's belated release date over here overflowed into making a lot of icons from my Granada screencaps. +74 )
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
So, continuing to watch and screencap my Granada Holmes episodes today! Because the box sets are packaged differently in North America and in northern Europe, I thought I had seen all the episodes in the Granada Sherlock Holmes "Movie Box", but I had not.

"The Master Blackmailer" is an extended 100ish-minute version of the Return short story "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton". There are a lot of Holmes/Watson stories out there which deal with blackmail, because the blackmailer, that vile creature, is particularly dangerous in the context of Victorian homosexuality - since it was still illegal.

This episode, however, is remarkable. To think it should have been one of my favorites all along, but I didn't even know it! This is not as adorable as "The Six Napoleons", nor as romantic as "The Devil's Foot", but it is one of the most intensely established-relationshippy episodes, I think, and has lots of really funny parts - besides which it adds context to the whole thing where Holmes flirts with Milverton's housemaid for information, and that was badly needed. Brett's Holmes feels badly about it, but it's also quite clear that his rival for her affections is ready and more than willing to step in. Besides which, the maid is saucy and rather charming, and Holmes's scenes with her are hilarious. It also adds homosexuality explicitly, which I think is good on the whole, even though the gay couple turns out Evil and Dead (respectively). But yay for the drag show!






This is kind of a recap, with about, oh... 150 caps. )
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
Since the new Sherlock Holmes isn't out here for a while yet and the hype is constantly rising, today I felt moved to start to make screencaps of the remaining bits of Brett/Hardwicke Granada Holmes canon which I own, and have not heretofore screencapped. I watched the feature-length "The Eligible Bachelor" (based on "The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor" in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes [book], but set instead between the episodes in The Return of Sherlock Holmes [tv]).

There are some excellent performances in this episode from the guest stars, some really beautiful photography, and a performance that was extraordinary even for Brett of Holmes distracted and haunted by his recurring nightmare. So far as it goes, this is pretty good, but the changes that were made to turn the short story into a 100ish-minute feature were a bit unfortunate. Not as unfortunate as that incredibly cracktastic and scummy later episode, "The Last Vampyre", but still fairly unfortunate.





Also there are a lot of screencaps in here.

It's nice to address the giant morass of issues surrounding women and women's 'insanity' in the Victorian era, but why did you have to add a non-canonical surprise!leopard and the completely gratuitous intrusion of the supernatural in the form of Sherlock Holmes, of ALL people, having *prophetic dreams* that, um, then don't even turn out to be important to the plot? )
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (windswept)
Well, for Yuletide I wrote Clean Linen for RosieR. This is 22,000 words of sequel to Georgette Heyer's The Unknown Ajax with a crossover cameo from April Lady's Felix Hethersett (Claud/Felix).

The Unknown Ajax is one of my favorite Heyer novels and I passionately ship Richmond/Vincent, but since I love everything about it I signed up for "any". My recipient had requested Claud slash without specifying whom she wanted him slashed with. I kind of thought she was just trying to be nice, and asked (through proper Yuletide channels) for a clarification of her preference, but it turned out that she really honestly didn't have one, except not slashing him with Richmond (I'm not sure why she felt that way, but it accorded with my shipper's soul, since I only want Richmond to be paired with Vincent); and she gave the okay to OMCs, which was how I decided to borrow a sidekick from another Heyer book. (Well, actually, I combed through about 20 different Heyers from my shelf before I settled on Felix, but the story there is lengthy.)

Besides the scandal, shenanigans, and madcap coincidence plot which I thought was necessary to make a good Heyer story (fervent thanks go to [personal profile] fairestcat for helping me to hammer that out!), the main thing I wanted to do was put homosexuality into Claud's life. Claud is one of Heyer's many secondary characters who read as coded-homosexual to me, and I wanted to add the homosexual lifestyle - subculture, that is - to the story. In the clueless stage I asked my spouse, and she provided the Period Equivalent of a Gay Club prompt. Also invaluable to me in writing this was this book I got for my birthday:

Strangers: Homosexual Love in the Nineteenth Century by Graham Robb. The author is an award-winning biographer who carried out a great deal of research around Europe using primary sources, and the book has lots of fascinating information on how people lived, hooked up, found each other, and talked about what they were doing throughout the 19th century. There's also a section devoted to homosexual representation that addresses Evil or Dead Queers (not by that name), including EM Forster's comment that Maurice wouldn't be big because his protagonists survived it without punishment. (Ouch.) Also, did you know that Tchaikovsky and Hans Christian Andersen were gay? That Walt Whitman lived with a little laborer dude happily, but once denied the homosexual implications in Leaves of Grass in writing? That throughout the history of Christianity many have read the Bible as Jesus/John the Baptist (est rel), and that one of the books removed from the Bible in the middle ages by the Church intimated as much very much more directly? That Arthur Conan Doyle's life was changed when he met Oscar Wilde at a dinner party, that he still talked about it years later, and that he declared his intention of making a study of homosexuality, which he considered not a hanging offence but a medical matter? (Robb theorizes that Holmes is based on Wilde. That whole section is awesome and, ahem, pretty wild.) In short: BUY THIS BOOK.


To return to "Clean Linen" for the moment, nobody commented that I was too obvious with the Richmond/Vincent in the background, so perhaps my decision to remove the part where Richmond tells Vincent that he's not in the petticoat-line was effective after all. I still worried that I was being a bit too obvious with my actual shipping preferences, so feel free to tell me if you thought so. I'm currently weighing whether to write a Richmond/Vincent sequel to it, actually, for my own satisfaction if nothing else. I originally envisioned all of that being entirely off-screen, but nonetheless resolved in the course of the story; but when I reached the end I realized that I don't think they are ready to hook up yet, after all.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (umbrella)
  1. An Original Work (Authenticity and Provenance Debateable). St Trinian's, Annabelle/Kelly. Hustle crossover. A con job requires Annabelle to pretend to be Kelly's girlfriend.


  2. The Beginning of Wisdom. Poirot, Poirot & Hastings, friendship. Hastings comes home to England; Poirot has a Christmas plan all ready for him. Casefic... kind of.


  3. Just Rewards. Poirot, Poirot & Hastings friendship and/or smarm. Hastings gets ticked off on Poirot's behalf; Poirot counsels patience.


  4. The Mechanical Heart. Sherlock Holmes, Holmes/Watson UST. This is clearly a pairing story in addition to casefic, but as nothing is explicit aside from Holmes's passionate concern for Watson's safety, and occasional whimsical concern for his happiness, it could actually fit quite well in canon - probably without shocking a Victorian readership.


  5. Of Events Past and Future. The Masqueraders - Georgette Heyer. Canon pairings, gen. Prudence and Robin, their father and their spouses beguile an afternoon around the fire with a tale of their past escapades (by which we mean 'cons') told by Pru. Which is bloody fantastic - hilarious, wonderful, exactly in the style of the original. Made me wish for a whole novel or four of sequels (well, prequels?), like a Georgian version of Hustle.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
I encourage anyone who has read Sherlock Holmes slash fiction at all widely to respond to this discussion post at [livejournal.com profile] cox_and_co (filtered to community members, but it's worthwhile to join if you've any interest, even currently inactive, in Holmes slash). [livejournal.com profile] potatofiend is writing a paper on Holmes slash for presentation at an academic conference and could no doubt use all the interested reader opinions she can get; they always like you to quote other people for that.

ETA: I've reproduced my thoughts here for accessibility/posterity. On common holmesslash tropes, personal canon, unreliable-narrator!Watson, Mary, Holmes & Watson's sexual orientation and sexual experience, mostly. )
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (holmes)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/25/movies/25lyal.html?pagewanted=2&_r=2&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

The new Holmes is rougher, more emotionally multilayered, more inclined to run with his clothing askew, covered in bruises and smudges of dirt and blood. This Holmes falls into modern-style funks between cases, lying on the sofa, suffused with anomie, unshaven and unkempt, surrounded by a pile of debris. He keeps his bills pinned to the wall with a bowie knife.


Wow! You know, this almost reminds me of some ground-breaking character from literature! You might have heard of him, Guy Ritchie and Lionel Wigram! He's by Arthur Conan Doyle! They act like they invented a characterisation which not only is straight from the text (the text goes completely unmentioned in the article), but which is hardly unrepresented onscreen (in an episode of the Brett Holmes - not coincidentally widely considered the definitive one! - Holmes sets the newspaper on fire with a chemical experiment).

Meanwhile you have such baffling claims as

Lionel Wigram, who conceived the story and is also a producer of the film, said that reinventing Holmes as an action hero made perfect sense. “I never agreed with the idea of the fairly stuffy Edwardian-type gentleman,” Mr. Wigram said. “It wasn’t my idea of Sherlock Holmes.”


Oh yes, how strange that an Edwardian would be Edwardian!

Susan Downey, a producer on the film and Mr. Downey’s wife, said Holmes is “a bit of a ladies’ man, a bit of a brawler,” adding: “He has a gambling problem. If you’re a Sherlock Holmes fan who is in love with the original stories, then you’ll appreciate him.”


Especially if you didn't notice how he hates women in them and you think that "gambling" and "cocaine" are the same thing.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (bored now)
Every now and then I got a cosy domestic vibe from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, but Holmes is still much less warm and cuddly than after the return. I am satisfied with setting the first time after "The Empty House", or maybe a couple of cases afterwards. Still, some of the funniest short-stories are in that volume, possibly destined never to be watched again since I'm still not positive whether I want to buy the Jeremy Brett versions, starring as they do The Wrong Watson, not Edward Hardwicke but that other guy, whatever his name was. "The Speckled Band" is particularly domestic (though I'm not otherwise a fan - ACD is at his weakest, IMO, when he tries to introduce the exotic), and also the introductory scenes of "The Noble Bachelor" and "The Beryl Coronet".
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (dangerous)
arrow fredericaarrow lady of qualityarrow regency buck

angela carter - the bloody chamberamber omnibuseight days of luke

penguin holmes    penguin holmes


These are the principal books I demanded for Christmas from Wax, but I also got a Tracy Chevalier (whom I like, but don't follow eagerly) and an Alexander McCall Smith (been meaning to try) from my mother outlaw. And then I ordered an Alice in Wonderland omnibus for myself (I ordered the one with the awesome cover art, but it remains to be seen whether it will have been a mistake not to get the annotated one)(Those two covers are remarkably similar, but the simple grace of flat mary janes will always triumph over the lumpy, clomping, unattractive outline of platforms).

Yesterday Wax forgot that today was a bank holiday, so our decision to put off visiting Customs for my package first for five hours of fruitless puzzling over taxes and then until today... backfired and now we can't go to Customs after all. Also, we've got a lot of Lindex translashuns to do. Oh, Lindex, World-Class Fashion? How can you claim it, when I was in your store just yesterday marvelling at the dowdiness of your mannequins?

Besides the Heyers, at the recommendation of [livejournal.com profile] notjemima I've already read the bloody chamber )
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (actually you have to push this button)
For me, an important part of absorbing any canon is creating a personal canon of spackles and slash to fill in the gaps around it. Of course, I might read or even write first-times set anywhere in it, but there's always something that I really believe in, like: I believe in Fraser/Ray K at the end of "Call of the Wild", and in Kirk/Spock after "Amok Time", and in Holmes/Watson after The Return, and in Garak/Bashir not before the end of the entire series. I believe in Nick/Greg, if you want to talk about my current shows, either after or very shortly before "Grave Danger". (Which isn't to say that I always believe in my fictional OTPs, or even in pairings I like.)

So watching a show for the first time is interesting. After SWAK, and then a few times during season 3 of NCIS, I could almost believe in established Gibbs/DiNozzo. Not that I subscribe to the view of an emotionally abusive Gibbs who practically attacks Tony's confidence with hot pokers - but he did warm up a little, gradually. There was the episode where Tony was framed, especially. Wow, that one stood out for me. And I liked to read the UST there as conscious on Gibbs's side, if not, er, un-U (I mean, est rel already). But moving on to season 4, we have that whole Amnesia Thing. Not so much the amnesia itself as the Mexico Thing, I think, make it impossible for me to believe in a first time before that point. I mean, I've read some stories like that, but Gibbs's motivation just doesn't seem internally consistent through the s4 premiere to me that way if he knows about a romantic (or sexual, as long as there's warmth and affection in it - and look, okay, there is) relationship. So I could only buy it if his amnesia had totally hidden the entire thing from him, but I don't buy that either. Still a little fuzzy, maybe, but there was also that entire weird conversation between Ducky and Dr. Who Looks Like a Smaller Sean Bean about how amnesia just doesn't work like that and it must be, in fact, just emotional repression~. Not that I actually know anything about that - not a neuroscientist or a psychologist or anything - but I find the idea of it lasting that long, but only partially, too hard to swallow.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (batman)
I signed up for 11 fandoms for Yuletide and somehow forgot The Dark Knight. But I suppose it might possibly be just as well since I have more than ten thousand words of an unfinished TDK story on my harddrive already...

In retrospect it was probably correct to remove Criminal Minds from Yuletide - a glance at the newsletter will show you that it's quite active, but the problem is that it's not active with good fic. I've only read two or three pieces that I could even call decent, so every Yuletide always greatly increased the chances for something readable out there. The fandom used to be dominated by Gideon/Reid, which grossed me out because G. practically adopted him in canon, but at least I could see the logic for that. Recently, however, Hotch/Reid has outstripped Morgan/Garcia in popularity, and that just makes no sense at all. What makes even less sense is that by far the most popular pairing is Prentiss/JJ, which just... you know, ok, lesbian is good, but even before JJ's boyfriend, there was barely a few minutes of female bonding between the two of them - the entire rationale was apparently that they're cute and female! If anything JJ should have been slashed with Garcia, hello? And it's not like anyone who would slash JJ with Prentiss is susceptible enough to logic to consider Garcia's Mulder/Scully thing with Morgan. Which, you know, I haven't disinherited anyone for shipping Morgan/Reid either, and the fact that it's not all that popular helps with that, and also the fact that canon obviously doesn't intend to do anything with Morgan/Garcia except keep the UST at the same level for seasons and seasons and seasons without ever resolving it. I can't even say that's a bad decision on their part. Anyway, Morgan and Garcia are both obviously going to be hooking up with other people in that time, and while we as fans have access to the metatext, as long as we're going against it consciously there's nothing particularly wrong with going against it (which is why tinhat Harry/Hermione shippers are alarming, whereas reasonable people who are just like 'hey, H/H might have been a better choice because Ron is a moron' are... reasonable!). Of course, preferring Morgan/Reid to Morgan/Garcia is indicative of bad taste by my lights, but I don't have to read it, and I've known worse. Wax's mom serves two kinds of gross pickled fish things AND these disgusting jars of mutton rolled up with fat, like a big Twinkie of Evil and Animal Bits, at every single Christmas, and that's in a hundred times worse taste than Morgan/Reid.

I still think they should remove Sherlock Holmes from Yuletide too, though. I mean, the quality of Yuletide writing is generally higher, so it's good for me personally that it's there, but in all fairness, the lj community has been increasingly active the last couple of years and it's pretty steadily healthful at this point.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (me and my boyfriend)
I'd forgotten several things about The Sign of Four. I've read about, and noticed independently, how Conan Doyle's style changed a great deal midway through his career, and not just the style but the characterisation of Holmes and Watson as well. Early Holmes is less sympathetic to the reader, as well as less warm to Watson; their relationship is a bit impersonal, though friendly. And the whole thing both starts and ends with him injecting himself with cocaine.

The statistics I read about it really stuck with me. Besides the incidence of cocaine decreasing drastically as the series moves on, I wrote sometime in 2003 when I started intensively researching Holmes canon chronology (short answer: it doesn't make any sense because ACD didn't give a shit. Put it wherever you want),

In the early stories, he insults Watson three times for each endearment or compliment (something like that, numbers possibly a little fucked up), and[...] after The Return, it's like seven or eight endearments per insult.


After rereading the entire thing, I'll have to rewatch and post a commentary and screencaps. But though Holmes is still interesting and likeable, and maintains his semi-humourous role of weirdo which is so entertaining throughout the series, his inhuman ciphery characteristics are exaggerated. The sentimentality is a tad thick, but the quick-moving romance between Watson and Mary Morstan is actually better written than I had remembered.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (sad)

  • There is no flash player on this computer. It's getting really annoying.

  • Last summer was just full of good movies, wasn't it? And this summer is full of nothing that I want to see except maybe Iron Man. I was looking forward to St Trinian's regardless of anticipated quality (schoolgirl uniforms!) but it won't be coming out here at all.

  • [Star Trek: DS9] Garak: Poirot in Space! (WITH Bonus Badass Ex-Secret Service Action!) Discuss.

  • Most exciting discovery, for me, in six months: a heretofore-unnoticed but really wonderful, nearly flawless Sherlock Holmes slash writer: Holmes/Watson fan fiction by Katie Forsythe

  • I have an Ideal Dress, the one dress that has captured my imagination since I was a child and which I would unhestatingly order, if i could have Any! Dress! in! the! World! It's the green sequined dress Cyd Charisse shimmers around in seducing Gene Kelly in the "Broadway Melody" sequence of Singin' in the Rain and you can see a whole whopping great gallery of screencaps of it here.

    I always just assumed that everyone had an Ideal Dress and was unaccountably surprised that [livejournal.com profile] wax_jism didn't (I shouldn't have been because she doesn't really care about clothes, let alone dresses, except as she is occasionally inspired to want to imitate the dress of Mikey Way or whoever else she's desperately idolising/obsessing over).

    I think my mom's ideal dress was a crimson Renaissance-inspired partially-gauze scarf-skirted number she fell for at the age of about 22, and would have saved up for and worn to her wedding except that my fussy and dictatorial paternal grandmother said she "couldn't" come to the wedding if they waited long enough for Mom to afford it, so she canned the idea and made her own, a rose-printed silky white polyester shirt dress which as a child I always found horribly disappointing because it was so simple, but which I now admire for its classy understatedness. How about it - do [Poll #1183481]

  • Remember the brown brocade vest? Well, Wax has lost sufficient weight that her huge boobs finally fit into it and the dashed thing still hasn't got the decency to fit right. It would need just as much tailoring as it would on me to fit her, several inches off the top slopes of the boobage and more than that below, and it would end up looking like a corset. With all the lining and stuff it's not worth the trouble, so we shall have to give it up, but it's very sad with the gorgeous Chinese medallions and the silky brocade. The only silver lining I can find is that it is not, in fact, made of ACTUAL silk, only a very convincing synthetic. Were the silk genuine I'm sure I couldn't bear to part with it ever, from the value of the fabric alone.

  • I feel quite wistful and given to nostalgia lately. Missing people who have passed out of my life. A trifle lonely. I wonder if heartache is a silly metaphor which, when read about a lot, eventually causes you to imagine a physical sensation in the region of the heart, or whether on the contrary the chest really does get tight and sensitive-feeling, momentarily, in the grip of sadness, and 'heartache' was coined to describe the symptoms.

  • Taking after one's parents so much is either a very good (at least it's predictable?) or a very bad thing (over-exposure in early years makes the symptoms particularly depressing when they appear).


cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (neutral)
After his return in "The Empty House" (I didn't mark whether it's in the second one, I'm afraid, but it's present by "The Second Stain", the third episode in The Return of Sherlock Holmes), there's a huge print of the Reichenbach falls illustration from "The Final Problem" hanging over the fireplace at 221b Baker Street:

cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (Default)
wanted: a better first-time holmes/watson story set during or after "the empty house"1. i can't make it anywhere else by film canon. the beginning of "the musgrave ritual" is enough to make me like established relationship.

captioned caps focusing mostly on said beginning. )

on the other hand, it's clear the cocaine is a wedge driven between them steadily more after holmes's return, with the arc culminating in "the devil's foot" when holmes gives it up. so maybe i could buy it somewhere there or after, with a lot of intense UST (or unresolved emotional tension) in between.

this has always been one of my favourite stories in written canon because the ritual itself is just so, well, peculiar and cute - there aren't that many where holmes solves actual word-puzzles.

1. than the one i once wrote for [livejournal.com profile] dementor_delta, i mean.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (Default)
i feel acutely my lack of fandom (read: arashi) participation over the last couple of weeks. ohmiya daily has been on hiatus because i ran out of capped ohmiya episodes and time for watching japanese reality tv on my own. i still love arashi! and you guys! and after my exam on monday i'm sure i will have some fandom time again.

in the meanwhile for stress relief i've been surfing delicious1 and reading stargate atlantis again. [livejournal.com profile] isilya and [livejournal.com profile] wax_jism have heard a bit of half-formed meta stewing in my brain about the phenomenal popularity of sheppard/mckay, which i think can be compared to no other fandom/OTP explosion in the past decade so germanely as to the qui-gon/obi-wan one after TPM (which was similarly popular and also based on a similarly slim foundation of canon).

1. del.icio.us-surfing procedure: click on a "also saved by n other people" link from your own page of bookmarks, preferably from a story you like a lot; the trick is not to pick a story that's been saved by too many other people. the best is one you like which isn't very popular and isn't by one of the authors whom everyone bookmarks; the incidence of their stuff is going to be high in any list of bookmarks, and it's not much use to you obviously, unless you've just discovered fandom this very instant. browse the comments/tags used by the other people who bookmarked it. click on the fandom/pairing tag of one of these users and skim their bookmarks for new reading material.


csi ny ) veronica mars ) and house was just as brilliant as everyone else is saying. i was somewhat disturbed by the fact, though, that the elder of the two guest stars bore a strong resemblance to my crazy conspiracy-theorist homophobic racist maternal grandfather. much more cultured accent though.

ooh, the new itunes has a slightly updated interface. i like it.

also, a couple of days ago i pouted until wax agreed to watch a bit of sherlock holmes with me. did you know that "the second stain" is "den andra fläcken" in swedish? it's great that their word for "stain" is the same as their word for "speck". it's one of my favourite film episodes because of the scene involving the titular stain when holmes and watson get my little rat boyfriend lestrade out of the room for about two minutes and holmes frantically examines every inch of the floor in his absence. also, holmes absent-mindedly sets the newspaper on fire at breakfast.

cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (curious)
blah--still no torrent for project runway 2x06, and the tracker's down for criminal minds.  on the plus side i only have one book left to read for monday's exam!

but more happily, wax gave me the jeremy brett return of sherlock holmes dvds for christmas and last night i watched "the empty house".

the first time i watched these dvds i wrote recap-reviews, including lists of high and low points and illustrative caps;  the caps were low-quality cameraphone images of the screen and are long gone, but my initial impressions are here, anyway.  last night  i obviously made 26 new caps. and some babble. ) i plan to make some annotated scenes next time, but today i feel constrained by the need to go do some reading.
cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (Default)

sub rosa, by [livejournal.com profile] prof_pangea.  gen, holmes and mycroft, composed entirely of images:  this is the collected correspondence of sherlock and mycroft holmes during the years between the disappearance and the return.  really, really cool. 

that's the text of the rec that's going on my recs page but it might not properly convey my enthusiasm.  the telegrams are all photorealistic, all varied and incredibly detailed;  the voices in the telegrams are excellent, the narrative funny and delightful. 

cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (Default)
here are a bunch of cards for you from some of my favorite pairings couplings people who have sex pairings and one threesome*.  it's not all the pairings i adore.  i just sort of made them until i stopped.

10 valentines )

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cimorene: A black-and-white vintage photograph of 1920s singer Helen Kane in profile, with a dubious, side-eye expression (Default)
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